Readers ask: What Is The Flamingo In A Streetcar Named Desire?

Flamingo Hotel: The Flamingo Hotel is one of Blanche’s homes of the past. It is a second rate hotel in which she lived and practiced prostitution. The hotel eventually threw her out due to her lifestyle.

Why was Blanche kicked out of the flamingo?

Gleefully, Stanley recounts how Blanche earned a notorious reputation after taking up residence at the seedy Flamingo Hotel. She was not given a leave of absence by her school—she was kicked out after a father reported his discovery that Blanche was having a relationship with a seventeen-year-old boy.

What did Blanche do at Flamingo?

What did Blanche do at the Flamingo Hotel? Blanche lived at the hotel after she lost Belle Reve. She was kicked out because she had prostitutes coming to her room. Why did Blanche leave her job?

What does Blanche say about Flamingo?

What does Blanche say about the Flamingo Hotel? She wouldn’t be caught dead in there!

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What is the streetcar a symbol of?

The Streetcar Symbol Analysis Williams called the streetcar the “ideal metaphor for the human condition.” The play’s title refers not only to a real streetcar line in New Orleans but also symbolically to the power of desire as the driving force behind the characters’ actions.

How does Stanley destroy Blanche?

As the play progresses, Blanche’s instability grows along with her misfortune. Stanley sees through Blanche and finds out the details of her past, destroying her relationship with his friend Mitch. Stanley also destroys what’s left of Blanche by raping her and then having her committed to an insane asylum.

What is Blanche’s secret?

At the beginning of the play, Blanche tells lies and knows that she’s lying. For example, she tells her sister in Scene One that she’s simply taking a “leave of absence” from her job as a schoolteacher. We suspect at this point that she’s not telling the truth, and our suspicions are later confirmed.

What is ironic about Blanche singing Paper Moon?

As Blanche sits in the tub singing “It’s Only a Paper Moon,” Stanley tells Stella the details of Blanche’s sexually corrupt past. Williams ironically juxtaposes Blanche’s fantastical understanding of herself with Stanley’s description of Blanche’s real nature.

Why is Stanley so suspicious of Blanche?

What is Stanley’s suspicion concerning the loss of Belle Reve? He is suspicious because Blanche didn’t explain any details about the loss, they don’t know if she sold it or it was foreclosed.

Why does Mitch say he won’t marry Blanche?

Mitch says he won’t marry Blanche anymore because she is not clean enough to bring into his house with his sick mother. Stanley comes home from the hospital. Blanche tells Stanley that Mitch came to see her tonight in her work clothes. He started to ramble off stories that Stanley had told him and then left.

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Why does Stanley not kiss Stella in front of Blanche?

Key interpretation. Stanley’s refusal to kiss Stella in front of Blanche could show that he is inhibited in Blanche’s presence, or that he resents his wife for allowing her to stay with them.

What is the significance of the Hotel Flamingo?

Allegedly, Siegel named the resort after his girlfriend, Virginia Hill, who loved to gamble and was nicknamed “Flamingo”. It is reported that Siegel called her this because of her long, skinny legs.

How is the spilling of the Coca Cola on Blanche’s dress symbolic?

For Blanche, whose name means white in French, the whiteness is in contrast to her lost innocence and purity. When Blanche spills coke on her white dress during the play, it is indicative that her past is spotted. She tries to blot out the coke stain, just as she tries to blot out the truth of her past.

What does bathing symbolize in A Streetcar Named Desire?

Bathing. Throughout A Streetcar Named Desire, Blanche bathes herself. In light of her efforts to forget and shed her illicit past in the new community of New Orleans, these baths represent her efforts to cleanse herself of her odious history.

What metaphor is in A Streetcar Named Desire?

Williams called the streetcar the “ ideal metaphor for the human condition.” The play’s title refers not only to a real streetcar line in New Orleans but also symbolically to the power of desire as the driving force behind the characters’ actions.

What is the Blue Piano in A Streetcar Named Desire?

As well as symbols expressed in visual images or in words, notice how Williams uses music to convey a message throughout the play. The blue piano stands for the callous vitality of the Vieux Carré (also known as the French Quarter) of New Orleans, while the Varsouviana polka recalls the tragedy in Blanche’s past.

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